Archive for June, 2010

Time to Get Started!

June 19, 2010

For starters, thanks for reading this new blog.   The whole point of this blog is to track the progress of our Ragnar Relay team and bring some awareness to Osteogensis Imperfecta (www.oif.org).

Twelve coworkers and friends got together for a new and exciting challenge – running a 200 mile relay race from the West Virginia panhandle all the way to RFK stadium in downtown Washington, DC.  The race took about 36 hours, and we all had our turn running through the night.

Of the 12 from last year, we have at least nine returning to run the relay race again.  Some have kept in better running shape than others.  Admittedly, I am not one of those in peak running condition (also, I wasn’t the best in race in September, either!).  So, this blog, along with the page we are running at the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation’s website will be a fine opportunity for myself and others to discuss their progress towards the final goal.

When we run the relay race in the fall, each of us will have to run three legs apiece, average about 5-5.5 miles per leg; about 15 – 18 miles per person.  The legs vary in length and difficulty.  My personal goal, is to be able to “comfortably” run 15 miles at once prior to race day.  The longest runs I’ve ever done were the Army 10 miler in 2006 and my first leg of the relay race last year at around 8 miles.  So for me, this will be a personal improvement (and will hopefully help me lose a little weight too) .

I’s my goal to raise some funds and awareness for OI.  My immediate friends and family of course know about my son Matthew’s condition.  Matthew has Type 3 OI which manifests itself most prominently in very brittle bones.  At 18 months old, he has broken about 12 bones… which is about 12 more than I’ve ever broken.   The condition is a genetic disorder in which the body makes collagen incorrectly or in insufficient  quantities.  The collagen is the basis material for the body’s connective tissues and small stresses can cause severe bone breaks.  As the months progress, I’ll do my best to incorporate information about OI in general, Matthew Young, or some of the other families and children we’ve met that deal with the condition.

I hope that as we go on, you keep an eye on our progress, and consider donating to the cause.

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